PSYCHIATRIC SURVIVOR GROUP MARKS 10 YEARS OF PROTEST.

 

On Saturday May 13th, psychiatric survivor group MindFreedom Ireland will mark 10 years of protest against the controversial procedure of electroshock with a public demonstration on The Grand Parade, Cork.

 

Increasingly worldwide, shock recipients are speaking out against the outdated and brain damaging procedure in the face of concerted campaigns by psychiatry to say it is safe and effective.

 

In the welter of information and misinformation being circulated, certain facts need to be clearly stated.

 

Firstly, by their own admission doctors do not know how it is supposed to work.  Secondly, deliberately provoking a grand mal seizure is at the heart of the procedure.  Thirdly, doctors also now admit that permanent memory loss can  be the result.

 

So controversial is the procedure that many psychiatrists themselves refuse to administer it.

 

Recipients relate how entire segments of their lives have been obliterated with their decision-making capacity severely curtailed.  Many say they were not given full knowledge of the adverse side effects before being pressurised into giving their consent.

 

Under the Mental Health Act 2001 an Advance Directive in which a person  states they do not want electroshock is not legally binding.

 

Typically, a single programme of electroshock can be up to twelve individual 'treatments', usually twice a week.  The most recent figures available show that over 2,000 'treatments' were administered in Ireland in 2015.

 

The protest commences at 2pm outside Bishop Lucey park.  MindFreedom Ireland campaigns for equal human rights for all and against forced psychiatry.  It calls for a total ban on electroshock as is the case in Luxembourg and Slovenia.

 

End.

 

MindFreedom Ireland, Cork.

Ph: 021 4894303.  Mob: 087 3893830.

MINDFREEDOM IRELAND PRESS RELEASE.

 

UN HUMAN RIGHTS ACTIVIST TO SPEAK IN CORK

 

U.S. lawyer and human rights activist Tina Minkowitz will speak at a public meeting in Cork on January 20th.

 

Ms Minkowitz is a former co-chairperson of the World Network of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry (WNUSP) and is founder of the Centre for the Human Rights of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry.

 

She represented WNUSP in the drafting and negotiation of the UN Convention of the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) in New York in 2007 and is credited with much of the advanced thinking of the CRPD in the area of legal capacity, liberty and respect for the integrity of the person, in effect providing human rights campaigners with a new foundation for challenging established standards in 'mental health' care. 

 

To date 160 countries have formally ratified the Convention.  The continuing Lunacy Regulation Act 1871 which condemned people to the status of non-citizens had caused problems for the Irish government and even though the long awaited Assisted Decision-Making (Capacity) Act 2015 was finally signed into law on 30th December 2015, issues surrounding 'mental capacity' and 'legal capacity' still remain, leaving Ireland one of only 11 countries, 10 years later, still to ratify the Convention.

 

In Cork, Ms Minkowitz will speak about her Absolute Prohibition Campaign which calls for a total and absolute ban on involuntary detention and forced treatment of people with psycho-social disabilities.  She says that too often the pain and suffering resulting from forced psychiatry is not acknowledged or is made to seem insignificant with the testimonies of survivors frequently disbelieved.

 

Fear and terror, disassociation from mind and body, brain damage including memory loss, deprivation of privacy and subjection to the will of others, withdrawal syndrome from psychiatric drugs, diabetes and damage to organs such as liver, kidney and thyroid are among the many effects experienced, making forced psychiatry a focal point for discrimination.

 

Ms Minkowitz has given expert presentations to the UN, government and NGOs in several countries and consults with interested parties analysing draft legislation in light of the CRPD.  She comes to Cork from Galway where she addressed a conference in UCG on 'Consent and Refusal: Mental Health Human Rights and the Law'.

 

As a worldwide initiative, her Absolute Prohibition Campaign is open to all survivors and non-survivors, relatives, lawyers, researchers, academics, service providers and journalists so long as they actually support the aim of prohibiting and abolishing all involuntary commitment and forced treatment.

 

The talk is being organised by MindFreedom Ireland, a Cork based psychiatric survivor and support group which for the past 14 years has been also campaigning for the same objectives.

 

It takes place in Bru Columbanus, Wilton, Cork on Friday January 20th at 7.00 pm.  Admission is free but donations are welcome.

 

End.

 

Jim Maddock,

MindFreedom Ireland,

Cork.

January 9, 2017.

086 0624445.

www.mindfreedomireland.com

 

 

                                                       Tina Minkowitz

 

A public protest against the controversial psychiatric procedure of electroshock took place in Cork on Saturday.

 

It was organised by MindFreedom Ireland, a psychiatric survivor group which campaigns for alternatives and against human rights abuse and forced treatments.

 

Among the speakers were 2 women in their 60’s who spoke of the enduring memory loss and cognitive dysfunction they experienced afterwards.

 

Responding to claims that electroshock today is new, safe and effective, one of the women said there was no difference between now and when she had it over 40 years ago.  It was and still is a traumatic experience visited upon people who were already traumatised and vulnerable.

 

Twice as many women than men were shocked today while research from Trinity College and the Scottish ECT Accreditation Network saying it was effective was less than impartial being conducted by people who were in favour of the procedure.

 

It was also stated that the recent removal of the word ‘unwilling’ from Section 59b of The Mental Health Act in effect made little difference as legally, a person deemed ‘unable’ will be considered to lack capacity and with the agreement of 2 psychiatrists, can still be forcefully subjected to the procedure.

 

Another speaker said that psychiatry was the only branch of medicine that deliberately induced seizures in the name of help.  While it says that it is “an important and necessary treatment”, the truth was that many psychiatrists themselves refused to utilise it and that 2 European countries, Slovenia and Luxembourg, had totally banned its use.

 

The protest, the 8th organised by MindFreedom Ireland, took place in torrential rain and was attended by people from many parts of the country and also by members of The Irish Critical Voices Network which is a network of people from diverse backgrounds who want an Irish mental health system which is not based on the traditional bio-medical model.

 

END.

 

 

Jim Maddock,

MindFreedom Ireland,

Cork.

PUBLIC ELECTROSHOCK PROTEST.

 

 

A public protest against the controversial psychiatric practice of electroshock will take place in Cork on Saturday, May 7th.

 

It is being organised by MindFreedom Ireland, a Cork based psychiatric survivor group which campaigns against human rights abuse and forced ‘treatments’.

 

During electroshock, an electric current is passed through the brain inducing a grand mal seizure. It is an extremely controversial procedure with proponents claiming it as an essential last resort treatment.  Critics say it causes trauma, brain damage and enduring memory loss, is outdated and dehumanising and call for its total abolition.

 

The most recent figures from The Mental Health Commission show a national increase in the use of electroshock with a 70% increase in the number of programmes administered without consent.

 

A recent amendment to the Mental health Act 2001 removed the word ‘unwilling’ but in leaving the word ‘unable’ effectively left the power to forcefully administer it still in the hands of two psychiatrists.

 

This will be the 8th protest organised by MindFreedom Ireland and takes place between 2pm and 4pm outside Bishop Lucey Park on Grand Parade.  Testimonies on how it affected them will be given by survivors of electroshock.

 

END.

 

Jim Maddock,

MindFreedom Ireland,

16, Manor Close,

Thornbury Heights,

Rochestown,

Cork.

MindFreedom Ireland

present

An Evening with Terry Lynch

who will be interviewed by Patrice Campion

on his new book

'Depression Delusion 
The Myth of the Brain Chemical Imbalance’

Personal testimonies will be given by Colette Ni Dhuinneacha, Barbara Barrett, John Sawkins and Mary Maddock on how the ’Depression Delusion’ impacted their lives followed by questions from the audience.

‘ Sing it from the Mountains’ composed by Mary Maddock will be sung by Susan Mendez.

8.00 pm Tuesday 8th September

in the Imperial Hotel, South Mall, Cork.

Admission free